Statue of Mentuhotep

Statue of Mentuhotep

Mentuhotep Nebheptre, the king who unified Upper and Lower Egypt for the second time after King Narmer. He is depicted wearing the Red Crown and a tight fitting costume of the Sed festival, a jubilee celebrated after 30 years of a reign. His black skin and the position of his crossed arms associate him with the god Osiris, god of death, fertility, and resurrection. The statue was found by chance by Howard Carter when he stumbled into a shaft while riding his horse through the forecourt of Mentuhotep’s mortuary temple at Deir el-Bahari. In 1900, Carter excavated the shaft and found a small chamber containing the statue intricately wrapped in linen, along with other artifacts.

Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, reign of Mentohotep Nebheptre (ca. 2030-2000B.C.)

Medium: Painted sandstone.

Provenance: Deir el-Bahari, Mortuary complex of Mentuhotep Nebheptre